Everything that is included in the Cellulose package plus two part foam
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20-25% Estimated
Energy Savings

Cellulose + Insulation

Attic Insulation Quotation Calculator
Guided Tour
Bath Fan & Flu Pipe
Bath Fan & Flu Pipe
Blown In Cellulose
Blown In Cellulose
Spray Foam on Top Plates
Spray Foam on Top Plates
Finished Cellulose Insulation
Finished Cellulose Insulation
The Cellulose + package includes everything from the basic Cellulose insulation package, along with some added benefits. This package will involve a process of moving back the insulation in your home so we can access the top plates and form a more airtight seal. The top plates are where the interior wall meets the ceiling, which is very much connected to the house, and also where most of the attic bypasses are. Once we have access to the top plates, we can seal them with 2 inches of two-part foam. The two-part foam is a high performance insulation with a very high R Value. It is also a closed cell foam, which gives a permanent airtight seal.
Blower door -test in
The blower door is a diagnostic tool that we use to measure the airflow from conditioned space to the unconditioned space outdoors. By depressurizing (or in some cases pressurizing) the home we are simulating a 20 mph wind that accentuates the air leaks.

First, we take some measurements of the home and use them to do some calculations to figure out what the “building airflow standard” (BAS) is for that house. The BAS (which matches up with ASHRAE 62.2-2010) is the TARGET for a healthy home. A healthy home should have a natural air exchange of about 35% of the volume of the house per hour. (as stated by BPI)

After we have a target number, we do the blower door test to see how much air sealing is needed. If the house is below the healthy house standard for airflow, we will need to evaluate the need for mechanical ventilation.

The blower door test also allows us to identify where the leaks in the home are and help us plan our air sealing measures.

“If the measured CFM50 is less than the BAS, as set forth in the ASHRAE 62.2-2010, mechanical ventilation must be recommended or installed according to the standards.”(BPI)

“Blower door tests must be performed before and after the installation of air sealing, enclosed cavity insulation representing more than 15% of the shell area, or sealing of the duct-work located outside the building envelope.”(BPI)


Appliance Safety Test-Test in
This test also known as the “CAZ worst case depressurization test” is used to make sure the combustion appliances are drafting correctly. By turning on the bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans, the dryer and the air handler, among other things like opening certain doors and closing others, we are setting the house in the worst case scenario to make sure all of the natural drafting combustion appliances are drafting properly, even during the worst case conditions.

”A preliminary and post-installation safety inspection of all combustion appliances must be completed whenever changes to the building envelope and/or heating system are part of the work scope. This inspection includes all of the following tests: carbon monoxide (CO) measurement at each appliance, draft measurement and spillage evaluation for atmospherically vented appliances, and worst-case negative pressure measurement for each combustion appliance zone (CAZ).” (as stated by BPI)

”With the exception of unvented gas or propane cooking appliances, CO must be tested in all combustion appliances under worst-case conditions and normal draft conditions (when the appliance fails under worst-case). In addition, it is recommended that CO be tested under a mild down-draft if conditions are safe.”(as stated by BPI)

”Spillage and draft tests must be completed for all natural and induced draft space heating systems and water heaters. Spillage and draft must first be tested under worst-case conditions and then repeated for natural conditions if the appliance fails under worst-case.” (as stated by BPI)

”In homes with natural gas/propane service, the gas line must be inspected thoroughly and all leaks repaired.” (as stated by BPI)

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Appliance Efficiency Test
With this test we can determine if the appliances are running at their peak efficiency rate. By using a combustion gas analyzer and referring to the “BPI combustion safety action test level table” we can identify the need for service on the appliance.

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Attic Hatch
The attic hatch is often under insulated. First, we will insulate the hatch to R-30 with foam board insulation. Then we will install a barrier around the attic hatch; this prevents the insulation from falling into the home when the hatch is removed. Finally, we will weather-strip the hatch to make sure it is airtight.

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Bath Fan
Bath Fan
Exhaust Fans
All ventilation duct systems, including local exhaust, must be appropriately ducted to provide the most direct route outside as possible. We will install a box to cover the bathroom exhaust fan. This box will cause an airtight seal while allowing the fan to exhaust properly.

Recessed can light fixtures that are not IC-rated, chimneys and other heat producing obstructions must be baffled with an effective dam prior to insulating the area to maintain minimum clearances to insulation or other combustible products. (BPI)

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Can Lights
Recessed Light Fixtures
Many homes have recessed light fixtures that will need a box installed to keep the insulation from touching the housing. Until recently, light fixtures were designed to allow insulation to be installed directly on top of the fixture.

Recessed can light fixtures that are not IC-rated, chimneys and other heat producing obstructions must be baffled with an effective dam prior to insulating the area to maintain minimum clearances to insulation or other combustible products. (BPI)

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Flu Pipe Shielding
Flu Pipe Shielding
Chimney/Flu pipe
Heat Source Shield
There are potentially several heat sources that are exposed in the attic, including flu-pipe and chimneys. A barrier is necessary to keep the insulation from touching this heat source. This barrier assumes that the heat can dissipate properly. Insulation touching the heat source could be a safety hazard.

In most cases, we will install insulshield flashing to create a 2" barrier between the insulation and the heat source. Sometimes these barriers are made with drywall or another rigid material.

Recessed can light fixtures that are not IC-rated, chimneys and other heat producing obstructions must be baffled with an effective dam prior to insulating the area to maintain minimum clearances to insulation or other combustible products. (BPI)

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Attic Fan
Whole house fans (attic fans) are a great way to cool a house when the outdoor temperature is comfortable. It introduces fresh air into the house and it uses less energy than an air conditioner. However, the nature of the way the fans are built tends to make them a problem area for unwanted heat transfer, especially during the heating season. The metal parts of the fan are a major source of heat transfer through conduction. The louvers that open up when the fan is on tend to develop a buildup of dust over time that will not allow them to set down properly, causing a major source of infiltration.

We will install a cover on the inside of the home on the underside of the louvers which will cause an airtight seal. We will also install a rigid barrier in the attic so that the new insulation does not fall into the fan.

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Attic Bypasses
Air-sealing measures must be prioritized to reduce the stack effect and inhibit moisture migration into attics or other interstitial spaces.

When installing insulation, hidden penetrations called "attic bypasses" allow unwanted air exchanges between conditioned and unconditioned space.

This is a major contributor to energy loss. Air leakage accounts for up to 40% of the annual heating and cooling cost. When installing insulation, it is just as important to seal the bypasses as it is to add insulation. There are many conduits for air travel within the building's cavities, including soil stacks, soffits, recessed lighting, chimneys, wall chases, attic hatches, attic fans, duct boots, electrical penetrations, etc. The stack effect is caused by warmer air that pushes upward. Air that escapes through the attic bypasses creates suction at the lower levels, pulling air in.

We will do a thorough check of the attic to seal all of these bypasses, using the appropriate materials: caulk, expanding foam, etc.

Air-sealing measures must be prioritized to reduce the stack effect and inhibit moisture migration into attics or other interstitial spaces.(BPI)

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Remove old Insulation from Top Plates
Most of the penetrations from the house to the Attic are in the top plates of the interior walls. The house is very much connected to the attic through the bypasses that where created when the house was built by the plumbers, electricians and HVAC contractors. This is also where the walls meet the ceiling, which is another unseen area that is notorious for allowing airflow. By raking back the old insulation to expose the top plate we are able to find and effectively address more of these bypasses.

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Spray Foam Top Plates
Spray Foam Top Plates
Spray Foam top Plates and Bypasses
To achieve the proper R value, we use the chart provided by the cellulose manufacturer (Cell Pack) to determine how many bags of insulation to install in your attic based on the square footage, your existing insulation and your desired R value. Thus guaranteeing the proper density and designed performance.

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Top off to the desired R-Value with Cellulose
To achieve the proper R value, we use the chart provided by the cellulose manufacturer to determine how many bags of insulation to install in your attic based on the square footage, your existing insulation and your desired R value, thus guaranteeing the proper density and designed performance.

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Blower Door-Test out
Because we have changed the dynamics of the home by the installed insulation and air sealing measures, we need to do another blower door test and compare the results to the BAS for your home to see if we have hit the TARGET. (Many times the air-sealing measures will cause the home to drop below the BAS or TARGET, thus creating a need to consider mechanical ventilation as required by ASHRAE 62.2-2010) By comparing the before and after blower numbers we can effectively project the energy savings you are going to see.

“Blower door tests must be performed before and after the installation of air sealing, enclosed cavity insulation representing more than 15% of the shell area, or sealing of the duct-work located outside the building envelope.”(BPI)

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Appliance Safety Test-Test Out
Again because we have changed the dynamics of your home, we need to retest the appliances to make sure they are drafting properly.

”With the exception of unvented gas or propane cooking appliances, CO must be tested in all combustion appliances under worst-case conditions and normal draft conditions (when the appliance fails under worst-case). In addition, it is recommended that CO be tested under a mild down-draft if conditions are safe.”( BPI)

”Spillage and draft tests must be completed for all natural and induced draft space heating systems and water heaters. Spillage and draft must first be tested under worst-case conditions and then repeated for natural conditions if the appliance fails under worst-case.” (BPI)

”In homes with natural gas/propane service, the gas line must be inspected thoroughly and all leaks repaired.” (BPI)

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